Yosemite 2017 – Day 3

Cloud’s Rest

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I have wanted to hike Cloud’s Rest since I first learned about the hike a few years ago, and it was at the top of my list when we were planning this trip earlier in the summer. Cloud’s Rest is a 14.2 mile hike with about 1800 feet of elevation gain. From the top, it offers one of the sickest views of Half Dome in the park, along with views of Tenaya Lake, Mount Hoffman, North Dome, and so many other peaks that we could only begin to name when we pulled out our map. When we did the hike, it wasn’t terribly crowded, but there were other hikers on the trail. We did start pretty late in the day, around 10 AM, because we had hiked Pothole Dome first, so that may have made it seem like there were less hikers than if we had started the hike earlier in the day.

This first couple miles of this hike are a flat nature walk through the Tenaya Lake Valley. It’s shaded and smells like trees and is generally very enjoyable. It sort of makes you think like hey, this hike might not be too bad (you are wrong of course). You also walk next to a river for parts of it, which is nice.

Funny story time: I was using fairly new hiking shoes on this trip, and after we hiked Pothole Dome this morning, I spent about 15 minutes cutting up moleskin and bandaging my blistered feet. About 200 yards into the hike, there is a stream you have to ford and I just thought “oh no, now I have to stall our hike even longer”. I thought I was going to have to take the bandages off my feet, walk across the river, and then rebandage them. But, then my dad pulled through and won MVP of the trip when he carried me across this stream. Other hikers on the trail thought it was hilarious.

After that pleasant nature walk where you’re tricked into thinking this hike will be a breeze (I should’ve known better, we were in Yosemite after all), you gain 1000 feet of elevation in a mile on a bunch of switchbacks. The only redeeming thing about this part of the hike was that parts of it were in the shade. It’s not quite Half Dome status, but its certainly not fun to gain this much elevation this quickly at such a high elevation.

The next part of the hike was a pretty steep downhill for quite awhile (that you will feel on the way home) and then another nature stroll through some woods. There’s a small lake that you pass and a stream and lots and lots and lots of wildflowers. There were so so many lupins when we went, it looked like a fairy forest of lupins because at points they just blanketed the ground. There is a lot of water in this part of the hike, so there are also a lot of mosquitos. If you want to stop and take pictures, be prepared to be bitten. I ended up with 37 mosquito bites at the end of this trip (but don’t let that stop you from doing this hike, mosquitos really like my blood for some reason and my dad did not end up with that many bites).

After that, you start your ascent up Cloud’s Rest itself. It’s definitely not as steep as the first climb of the hike, but it’s not a comfortable uphill either. The scenery at this part of the hike isn’t really that great, so we just powered through this part with few stops until we reached the peak.

The peak of Cloud’s Rest is one of the coolest places I’ve ever been, but it was also terrifying for someone like me who has quite the fear of heights. On one of the sides of the peak is the furthest drop in the park. If you fell from here, you would fall around 5,000 feet. The way the peak looks is that it starts as a wide base, and then it gets really narrow as you get closer to the peak, and then once you make it to the top (where all the dope views are) it widens out again. The one thing I will say is to be very careful on that narrow part. If you trip, you’ll probably be fine, but a part of me felt like a strong gust of wind would just blow me off the face of the Earth.

THE VIEWS FROM THE TOP ARE SOME OF THE COOLEST THINGS I’VE EVER SEEN. You get one of the best views of Half Dome in the park, and can see so many other peaks. Using a map, my dad and I found Mt. Hoffman, North Dome, Tenaya Lake, and various other peaks. Even with the fires that were happening while we were there, the views were still amazing. I can’t even imagine what it looks like from the top of this peak on a clear day.

I highly recommend this hike and I would definitely do it again. Although it’s long, it’s not ridiculously difficult, and the views from the top are worth it.  10/10 would recommend.

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This is literally the coolest photo anyone has ever taken of me.

Can’t beat Yosemite! Thanks for reading!

Yosemite 2017 – Day 3

Pothole Dome

Today, we hiked both Pothole Dome in Tuolumne Meadow and Cloud’s Rest, but in this post I’m going to focus specifically on Pothole Dome (mostly because Cloud’s Rest really does deserve it’s own separate post).

Pothole Dome was about a 2-3 mile hike with only 300 feet of elevation gain (which a breeze compared to yesterday). Unlike some of the other hikes we did this week, I never felt like one misstep would mean near-immediate death, and it can be comforting to have that kind of security on a hike (especially when you are doing an abundance of near-immediate death hikes). When we went, the crowds were light. We did not see any other hikers on the dome; the few hikers who we passed were on the Tuolumne Meadow Loop.

Fun fact about me: I am OBSESSED with meadows. There’s something about a field of grass and wildflowers in the middle of a forest that really makes me content. I could wander in meadows all day without seeing gaining any elevation and be perfectly happy. I also love taking photos of wildflowers, and meadows often provide many different kinds of flowers as well as many different kinds of lighting to experiment.

Pothole Dome is on the west end of Tuolumne Meadow. It doesn’t have much of a trailhead, but there are a few spots you can pull into right off of Tioga Road. It’s easy to miss though, so make sure that you’re looking out for it.

The beginning of the hike is just through the meadow and then it skirts around the edge of the dome. When we were there, there were lots of white and yellow wildflowers and the grasses were very tall and green.

Finding the place where you actually start walking up the dome is a bit tricky. Basically, its when the trail curves left for the first time and when the trail curves left for the second time. You have to walk through a small patch of trees and then you just walk right up the rock.

It is a bit strange to be walking up what feels like concrete in the middle of a wilderness, but that’s how you make it to the top. There’s not really a trail (although there were some markers when I went), but it flattens out at the top so you should know that you made it. It’s not particularly steep, but we were all breathing a bit harder by the time we reached the top.

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The view from the top is, like everything else in Yosemite, beautiful and varied and the type of view you could only find in Yosemite. You can see clear across the meadow all the way to Lembert Dome. The river snakes lazily through the meadow in wide curves that look fake from the height you’re at. Off in the other direction is Unicorn Peak which was till covered in snow. Facing the road is a massive face of granite that I don’t even think you can hike. For such a short hike, you get incredibly varied views in all directions.

I would definitely do this hike again. It was short, easy, and had a big pay off at the top. Plus, you get to walk through a meadow, and meadows are the best.

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Thanks for reading!

Yosemite 2017 – Day 2

Lower and Upper Yosemite Falls

On this day of our trip we hiked lower and upper Yosemite falls, although I’m not sure I would call lower falls a hike so much as a nature walk on pavement. It’s a half mile loop there and back that’s really easy and mostly flat right up until you get to the viewing point of the falls. The falls, of course, are gorgeous. This is a great hike to do as a warm-up, if you don’t have that much time, or if you have someone with you who has limited mobility. We did it as a warm-up before our main event, which was hiking upper Yosemite falls.

Warning – I would not recommend hiking upper falls unless you are a fairly experienced hiker and don’t mind lots of people on the trail with you. The trail is 7.2 miles round trip with 2,700 feet elevation gain. It’s a difficult hike, and, to be perfectly honest, the hike isn’t all that attractive until you make it close to the top. It was an alright hike, but it’s definitely something I only want to do once.

The trail starts up a series of steep switchbacks that seem like they go on forever. The switchbacks are, however, in the shade because you are surrounded by trees. It makes it difficult to get a view of how far you have climbed up, but we welcomed the shade on the hot August day in which we made the hike.

After you finally reach the top of what seems like endless switchbacks, you reach this plateau area where the trail is fairly flat, and there’s even some downhill (which is annoying on the way back). There’s some gorgeous views of the valley floor and half-dome and, when you go around the corner, you get your first view of Yosemite falls on the hike.

This flat area of the trail leads to, you guessed it, more switchbacks! This is definitely the hardest part of the hike because the switchbacks are steep, long, and 100 percent in the blazing sun. You do, however, get some pretty sweet views of the valley floor as you climb. Coming from sea level straight into this hike I actually got a bit of altitude sickness. Just take it slow and remember to bring lots and lots of water!

I won’t bore you with any more descriptions of the switchbacks. Just know that it was long and tiring and took a freaking long time to hike. Eventually, the switchbacks flatten out and you reach the top. I know you’ll probably want to stop here and never move your body again, but if you can garner up the energy, I would recommend walking the extra couple hundred yards up to the top. Here you get a view over the valley floor and of half dome. You can even look out over the waterfall which is awesome but a little freaky.

Another route you can take at the top is to the bank of the river that tumbles into Yosemite Falls. We sat and ate our lunch next to the river. However, please please please do not wade into the water. It’s easy to forget when you’re sitting along the peaceful, slow moving river, but you are at the top of one of the tallest waterfalls in the world, so treat the river that runs into that waterfall with respect and caution.

After a short rest and some lunch, we headed back down the trail. It was hot and dusty, but going downhill was significantly easier, and the sky was clearer of the smoke from the fire so we had a much better view of half dome and the valley floor on the way down. This hike was challenging with lots of awesome views. If nothing else, you get to stand on top of one of the tallest waterfalls in the world.

 

Yosemite 2017 – Day 1

Travel Day and Tuolumne Grove

So it is once again the best time of the year which is summer because that’s when I’m able to spend the most time in the outdoors. This year, my dad and I decided to take a summer trip to Yosemite because we both love the park and had a few big hikes we both wanted to do there. My friend Shayna is along for the ride too, but she’s left a day earlier than us because that loser has Hamilton tickets for the weekend.

Anyways, the way we planned this trip was a bit different than many of our other trips. Instead of doing a big backpacking or camping trip, we decided to actually AirBnB a house about 40 minutes outside of the north entrance to the park because I needed to be able to put in my weekly 12-15 hours of studying for the LSAT and my dad was on-call for work. From this house, we drove to various hikes in the park such as Upper Yosemite Falls and Cloud’s Rest (and many more). When my dad first suggested this idea for the trip I was hesitant because I felt like it wasn’t “real hiking”, but it has actually been a very cool way to get an extremely varied experience of the park and still be comfortable in the evening. (Don’t worry though, we’re planning a “real” backpacking trip to Sequoia National Park next summer already).

We got up the first morning bright and early and managed to make it out the door at around 7 am. The drive itself was very uneventful, and we made it to the entrance of the park around 1 pm. My dad had been told by a ranger that there was a half hour to an hour wait time just to get into the park but there was only one car in front of us so we didn’t have any problem. Since we got there much earlier than expected we decided to do a short hike in Tuolumne Grove to get ourselves acclimated to the higher elevation and kill some time before we could go to our Airbnb and because Sequoia trees are gorgeous and very large.

Unlike many parts of Yosemite, there is a decent amount of close parking for this trailhead. We didn’t find a spot in the actual parking lot (of course), but we found a spot about a quarter mile down the road. I’m actually way happier we parked there than in the lot because the road ran through a meadow full of wildflowers and it was so pretty. (I also literally love meadows so much).

The hike itself is real short and easy. The signs by the hike kept giving different lengths for the trail, but if I had to guess I’d say it was around 2.5 miles (so about 3 miles total for us from our car). You start walking downhill on an old fire road surrounded by trees (that are not sequoias at this point unfortunately). It gets pretty steep at parts, but the trail is wide and flat and parts of it are paved, so it’s easy to walk on.

The actual Sequoia grove is at the bottom of the fireroad where the trail flattens out. Down here is about a half mile loop that takes you through the grove and past (and through) some awesomely tall and gorgeous trees. It’s much narrower and a little more rocky, but the trees are gorgeous. The orange-brown color of Sequoias is so unique, and it’s crazy to me that some of these trees have literally been around for 2000 years (that’s the time of the Roman Empire!)

Here’s some other fun facts of Sequoias:

  1. They can live up to 3,000 years old.
  2. While sequoias can grow up to 300 feet tall (that’s about the height of a 26 story building) they are mostly known for being massive in diameter and width.
  3. The largest tree by mass is a sequoia tree know as General Sherman (although the tallest is a coastal redwood but shhhhh sequoias are still cooler).
  4. The General Sherman tree is 2100 years old!
  5. Sequoias reproduce by seeds in cones, which require fire to release them from their pods. Sometimes seeds spend 20 years inside a pod before they are released.
  6. Their seeds are also tiny, there are about 91,000 of them in one pound.
  7. They are pretty much only found in 77 groves in Northern California, but there are some in Europe that were planted in the 19th century.
  8. They are incredibly resistant to fire and disease and could (probably) survive an apocalypse because they are so hardy.

Anyways, back to the hike. One of the first sequoias you see is just massive. Here’s me and Shayna for scale.

Another cool part of this hike is the tunnel tree. It was carved out as a tourist attraction in 1870. Here we are again for scale. (Don’t worry, they didn’t carve it out until after the tree was already dead). It has that double pronged top because it was hit by lightning at some point. The inside of the tree is very carved with people’s names and had almost a polished appearance because so many people have run their hands over it.

Another cool attraction of this hike is a fallen over sequoia tree. You are able to see the underside of its massive root system and really get a sense of how tall these trees could grow because you get to walk next to it.

The last part of the hike is just walking that mile back up the fire road. It can get pretty steep but, compared to most of my hikes, this one was really short. I would rate it on the easy to moderate scale. It’s certainly not flat, but it’s short and more than half of it is downhill or on mostly flat ground so it’s really not that bad. It didn’t offer those grand sweeping views of rock formations that Yosemite is so famous for, but Sequoias are just as beautiful in their own and I really did enjoy this short hike.

After the hike, we made our way out of the park and went to a grocery store to pick up some food for lunch and dinner for the remainder of our trip. We got to the Airbnb, made dinner, and hung out, planned our day for tomorrow, and watched a movie (or, in my case, did LSAT problems) until  bed time. Tomorrow we were planning on doing Bridal Veil Falls, Lower Yosemite Falls, and Upper Yosemite Falls.

Thanks for reading! Here’s some more tree pics 🙂

 

The Ridge

The Best (and pretty much only) hike in Avila Beach, CA.

Disclaimer: I have probably done this hike over 50 times, which means that the pictures I have will be from various hikes, and also that many of the times I have been there I didn’t even take pictures. For example, I did this hike this past week, and I didn’t take a single photo, which I’m regretting now, because the fog created a cool effect over the ocean that I now don’t have a photo of. But I do have a million other photos that span over various years, so get excited.

The Ridge is a gorgeous hike and I think perfectly encapsulates the beauty of the Central Coast. You have panoramic views of the ocean for over half of the trail, and there are some fun and interesting caves/beaches you can explore at one point as well. You also have views of the grape and agricultural fields at various parts of the trail. It’s a respectable 3 1/2-ish mile trail which makes it perfect if you don’t have a ton of time but want to get some nature in. I’ve also had friends who have stopped here and hiked it with me while they were driving North on the 101 because it’s right off the freeway.

Sorry, I know some of these photos aren’t up to par but I’m fairly confident that last photo was taken on the first cell phone I even owned just to give you an idea of how long I have been doing this hike.

To get to the trailhead, you actually need to be in Shell Beach. You turn onto El Portal and Drive down that street until it runs into a fence. To the left of the fence there is a driveway and to the right of the fence there is the trailhead. Drive down the driveway and park your car in the lot. It’s really small, so if there’s no spots you can also park on the street across from the trailhead.

The trailhead starts you on a flat trail with your back to the ocean that basically walks below and next to the “ridge” mountain that you are later going to climb up and then back down. Right before you hit the 101, you start up a very steep trail. I know it sounds like it would suck to do a hike right next to a freeway, but once you’re past that initial climb, you can’t see it at all. And while you climb, you can see the ocean and the hills of the other side of the 101 so it’s never been a deal breaker for me.

Once you make it to the top of the ridge, you go through a series of up and downs as you traverse the trail. The rule with this trail is if you think you’ve gone up the last hill before you start walking down, you have one more. But fear not, the views along the way of the ocean and the houses in Shell and the agricultural fields means that you don’t really notice the incline all the much. Like seriously, the views are amazing.

After all that spread out uphill, you now get to do a very tricky and fairly dangerous thing: walk all the uphill back down in a very short amount of space. This part of the trail is essentially straight down. Make sure your shoes have some tread folks because you will be sliding a bit.

Side note: I’ve actually slid down this hill on pieces of cardboard in the middle of the night and had the cops called on us because our gleeful screams were confused for an injured hiker. The cop literally ran up this hill and we were all very impressed with his fitness level. We all thought we were going to get in trouble but the cop was pretty amused when we told him what we were doing and just told us to keep the noise down.

After that lovely downhill, it’s pretty much flat from here. If you go to your right there is a beach (that you have to climb down to) and some pretty sweet caves to explore. If you go to your left you are in the parking lot of Pirate’s Cove Beach. Fun fact: Pirate’s Cove is not a public beach, so if you wanna get naked/participate in some illicit activities (if you are of age of course) this is the beach to go to on the Central Coast.

After you’re done exploring, the trail takes you past the gate on an old fire road that is no longer in use that goes on the bluffs above Pirate’s Cove beach. You don’t get much a view, because you’re surrounded by tall fennel, artichoke, and yucca plants, but the purple flowers from the artichoke and white blooming Yucca are pretty, and the fennel makes the whole part of this trail smell like black licorice.

After you get to the end of the fire trail, you actually walk down Bluff Drive/Trail, which is a sidewalk trail with the ocean on one side and giant McMansions on the other. I am a fan of ignoring the signs that say pedestrians must walk on the sidewalk and like to walk on the street because 1) the sidewalk has inclines and declines and the road does not and 2) the road offers you a better view of all the giant mansions and I like to look at them. Pretty much this entire street is #housegoals.

The end of Bluff trail is where your car is parked if you’re parked in the lot. If you’re on the street you’re going to have to walk out of the lot and then you’re there. If you’re ever visiting or even just driving through the Central Coast I would highly recommend this hike. It has varied scenery, it’s quick, it’s not too easy or too hard, and people at many different fitness levels are able to complete it.

Some other notes about the trail: a lot of people actually do it in the reverse direction. I’ve done it that way once before but I didn’t like it because it’s really not fun to walk up that monster hill and then after that you might as well go sit back down because the rest of it is essentially downhill. I also like facing the ocean on my way up most of the hike and then down that monster hill as opposed to having it at my back for that first part of the hike and then a significant portion of the rest of the hike. It’s also very pretty to do this hike at sunset, but there are a few unmarked turn-offs and it’s hard to walk down that steep hill in the dark, so I wouldn’t recommend that if you’ve never done this hike before. All in all, this is a great hike that everyone who loves the ocean and enjoys creeping on rich people’s houses will definitely enjoy.

Until next time! 🙂

 

Mount Baldy

June 17th, 2017 – This hike had its ups and downs… literally

Mount Baldy is the highest peak in Southern California at 10,064 feet of elevation. Mount Baldy is a nickname for the mountain; the actual name of the mountain is Mount Antonio. People nicknamed it Mount Baldy because the peak is so high in altitude that no vegetation will grow on the top and someone looked at the mountain and thought it looked like a bald man’s head. Thus, the name Mount Baldy was born. Even though it’s a nickname, the name Mount Baldy is more commonly used and the street to up to the Mountain and the town at the base of the mountain are both called Mount Baldy. Have I used the word Baldy enough?

This hike is rough, but beautiful. There’s A LOT of elevation gain in a fairly short time period and then going back down isn’t any easier. You can do the hike in a loop, which is always nice so then you get to see different things on the way up and the way down. We took Devil’s Backbone trail up to the summit and then Baldybowl trail on the way down.

To get to the hike, you have to drive up a windy road through a tiny town that reminds of the towns near Yosemite that are sort of nestled in the crook of a mountain. The road has some sharp turns and at some points it curves around at nearly 180 degrees.

The trail starts up a fire road. At first it’s paved and then it turns into a gravel road at the turn off to go up the Devil’s Backbone trail. The trail climbs fairly steadily, but it wasn’t too difficult and we still managed to do about a 20 minute mile. The trail is actually really pretty and there is a view through the mountains towards the ocean the entire time you walk up. We couldn’t actually see the ocean because there was a lot of haze, but I bet without the June Gloom there you would be able to see it in the fall or spring. There are also a lot of beautiful Yucca plants on the trail peppered among the pine trees and manzanitas. Right when you start up the trail about a half mile in there’s a pretty view of a multi-layer waterfall. As you’re walking up the trail in this part there is a ski lift running up the mountain that the switchbacks of the path sort of zig zags under. All I can say is that I really wanted to get on that ski lift a few times.

Eventually, the trail literally runs into the ski lodge. At this point we got a little confused because we thought it was strange that a trail just ran into the lodge, but my dad ran inside the lodge and asked one of the workers where the trail was and he told us to take the middle trail that run under the ski lift. My dad and I both took a photo next to the ski lodge because there was a cool sign that said “adjust your altitude” and because it perfectly framed Mount Baldy in the background. It also was definitely very weird to see a bunch of equipment such as snowmobiles and sledding hills without any snow.

I’m going to be honest with you, the next part of this hike is straight up awful. You gain so much freaking elevation in so little distance. The trail from the ski lodge is pretty steep, but it’s also kind of nice because you can finally see over the top of the mountain to the other side. It’s a pretty view because you can see the mountains on the other side and the squares of agricultural fields cut out in the distance beyond the mountains, almost like you’re looking at it from an airplane.

The next part of the hike is called Devil’s Backbone, and it’s aptly named. There’s a steep drop off on one or both sides of the trail at this part. It kinda does look like you’re walking along the backbone of the devil. It’s a little freaky at times because the path gets really narrow, but as with the rest of this hike, the views are really pretty. This past winter, there were actually two hikers who fell to their death off of this trail because it was icy and slippery and the trail is incredibly narrow. We just took it slow and were careful and it was kind of a fun trail once you got past the being freaked out part.

This next part is easily the hardest part of the hike. The hiking manual made my dad and I laugh because it said “this part of the trail has deterred many an experienced hiker”. The trail essentially just goes straight up the mountain in a curvy path. It’s unreal. I barely took any photos because I was breathing so hard and just sort of forgot I had a camera around my neck. There were a few large-ish snowpacks that I just didn’t get a good photo of, although you can see it in the left corner of one I took of the trail. I think it took us 40 minutes to do one mile. The elevation gain is also killer and I think my dad and I may have both gotten acute altitude sickness because we had terrible headaches. I essentially felt like I was crawling up the side of this mountain. I’ve done many a hike, including half dome and parts of the High Sierra Loop Trail, and this may have been the most difficulty I’ve ever had on a hike. My feelings about it can be accurately described by a man who made it to the top after us. He walked up the sign that signified you made it to the top, yelled “F*CK” at the top of his lungs, and then collapsed into a heap on top of his backpack. Same bro, same.

The summit of Mount Baldy is, as one would expect, quite bald. It wasn’t that windy the day we went up there, but another hiker whom I met at the top who’s done this hike every year for about 20 years told me it can get quite windy. There are piles of stones at the top that I’m sure are there for hikers to sit in and get out of the wind. My dad and I ate a sandwich and some snacks at the top, and then started on our way down.

We took Baldybowl trail on the way down. Another hiker who passed us said she’ll take this way up and down because it’s shorter, but I would never want to hike up this trail because it’s so dang steep. The downhill was almost as bad as the uphill for us, but that’s mainly because my dad and I both have hiking shoes that are over 6 years old and because we didn’t bring any poles with us. If I went on this hike again, I would definitely bring poles. It’s incredibly steep downhill (steeper than the way we took up) and poles would have kept us from sliding as much as we did and having to grab onto rocks every time there was a large drop. Just to give you an idea, there were parts of this hike that went downhill so quickly that I thought it was a water shoot and I was looking around for the actual trail. I would’ve done anything for a switch back.

Along the trail on the way down there are some interesting sights. We got to cross over a tiny stream and I thought it was very cute. There was also a ski lodge built in the 1930’s along the trail that’s owned by the Sierra Club and painted a vibrant green color. It had some chairs out front that were carved out of trees that were, as my dad would say, “nifty”.

After about 4 and a half miles of this death of a downhill trail where I lost a few toenails, you make it back to the fire road and back past the waterfall. I can’t say that I was sad to end the hike at this point, but I’m glad I did this because it was a challenge, I got to spend some time with my dad, and I got to spend an entire day outside after two weeks of being cooped up inside studying for finals. Nature always makes me happy. 🙂

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Thanks for reading! See ya next time folks!

Nature Photo Collab

I know this isn’t quite an adventure but…

Fun fact about me: I really enjoy hand lettering and like to think that I’m at least semi-decent at it. This past quarter at school I’ve been working with one of my friends, who is an incredibly talented nature photographer, to combine my lettering with his photography into prints. These are only preliminary ideas that need a bit of work to get them to the final product, but I thought I would share them because I am literally obsessed.

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This particular photo was actually what inspired the name of this blog, and I just changed it to be the header photo for this site. This photo was actually taken over a salt flat in Death Valley around sunset, which I think is sick.

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I love puns, they are my favorite thing in the world.

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I really like this one because I feel like the photo matches the quote super well. Also the single consistent color of the photo is pleasing.

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This photo of a buffalo was taken on Catalina island. The sunset in the background is gorgeous and the detail on the hair of the buffalo is crazy.

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I think this one might be one of my favorites because the reflection is gorgeous and the quote fits nicely into the photo.

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This little girl is adorable and the bird detail is incredible. Words might need to be darkened but also a huge fan of this one.

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Favorite quote in the entire world and one of my favorite place as well. This was taken in Big Sur at Pfeiffer State park.

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Hope you enjoyed! 🙂 There’s a few more in the works and I’ll post updates as we work on them more!